‘Hitman’s Bodyguard’ Review: Comedy Gone Wrong?

‘Hitman’s Bodyguard’ Review: Comedy Gone Wrong?

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Is it me, or are these 2017 movies trying a little bit too hard to be ‘extra’ hilarious? Hitman’s Bodyguard cranks up the funny by milking the comedic chops of its two leads – the banter-filled Ryan Reynolds and the ever-reliable “motherf—ker” sayer, Samuel L. Jackson.

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The movie gets going right off the mark with a lot happening in the opening scene. It’s one of those movies that you don’t want to walk into late, because you’ll have a hard time keeping up.

Samuel L. Jackson’s character Darius Kincaid is one of the world’s most notorious hitmen. Jackson is the highlight of the movie mainly because he has the most hilarious scenes. It’s good to see that even after a string of dramatic roles in movies like Kong: Skull Island, The Legend of Tarzan and The Hateful Eight, he can still be funny. And how crazy is it that he is now 69 years old?

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The handsome Ryan Reynolds plays Michael Bryce, a disgraced, formerly top-rated protection agent. He is tasked with the duty of protecting Kincaid, whom he has a bad history with. Kincaid is being sought after by murderous goons of an Eastern European dictator who’s standing trial at the International Criminal Court. Kincaid has agreed to testify against him in return for his wife Sonia (Salma Hayek) being exonerated. The journey the two have from England to The Hague in Netherlands has them continuously being followed by a trail of bullets.

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The movie picks up in the last quarter. The action-packed scenes are invigorating. As expected, there is cussing. A lot of it. And blood too. So, if you find bad language offensive or get queasy at the sight of blood, you may want to sit this one out. If not, then Hitman’s Bodyguard is a decent enough watch – especially since the big summer blockbusters have dried now up. It packs some nice action with a healthy dose of humour, despite employing all the predictable genre tropes.

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